SIERRA 1-32-29 WXH Section 32 and 29 4N 3W

I could not get production out of the OCC. May not have been reported to them yet. I just tried the OTC tax site again and it looks like it is down. Luckily, I still had it up on my screen from this morning. Will take screen shots. Sierra partial production from tax site.docx (614.7 KB)

You are not the nut this time!

I did get it to come up but don’t really understand the numbers as to how much it is making. Looks like to me it’s mainly a gas well??? When hubby gets here maybe he can explain it to me.

Thanks so much M…We’re not good at reading these reports but it doesn’t look like that good of a well to us. Is that what you’re thinking? Well, anyway it’s more than we had before. lol

Looks like a gas well with condensate. I figure any well that I get royalties on is better than nothing! They placed that well so that they could drill more if the economics are right, so I tend to think of the whole section drainage, not just one well. Generally better if they drill any new wells within a year of the parent well because of the potential pressure decline.

1 Like

Thanks M_ for that information! We were thinking it looked like mainly gas but it’s listed as an oil well. Didn’t know that about the gas pressure being more beneficial with other wells within one year but I don’t believe with the prices for the product being down so much the company will drill any more any time soon… It’s already been over a year since this one started producing. Maybe if Continental buys out Casillas production they will want to drill more later. Just thankful for anything we get!

I was just wondering if the Seismograph now days shows whether the product down there is oil or gas. I know they set some big tanks before they completed this well so I figured they were expecting a lot of oil not gas. Just curious.

Linda: I preface with I am neither a geologist nor seismologist, but I have lots of practical experience with both. Seismographs can be used with a certain degree of accuracy in defining the top and bottom of the various formations, and such, give an indication that the depositional environment is good for hydrocarbons. Seismographs do a good job of defining reservoir parameters and that is why they are used quite efficiently for shale formations. They are foul able and lots are dry holes are drilled using them as is the same with geology. So no, by themselves they can’t predict oil vs gas. Always good to remember the best tool in the geologist & seismologist bag of tools is a pencil with a good eraser.

Todd…thanks…gotcha!

There are usually 3-4 large tanks to collect the water used to frack the formation, and usually two tanks for oil (one main one, one back-up) for new wells even if they’re primarily gas. The water comes in fast up front so you need lots of tanks to hold the large volumes. Then they’ll usually remove some as they’re no longer needed.

In this part of the world usually seismic is used to see how the reservoir is moving and changing below the surface so the well is able to follow the reservoir as they steer while drilling. Older vertical wells are usually used to look see what the qualities of the reservoir are by logging properties of the rock up the well-bore (“well logs”), like if it’s gas or oil, how much water is in there with it, and how good the reservoir rock is (how porous, etc.).

Looks like where this well is the reservoir is quickly transitioning from oil to gas within a 5 mile span (in the same reservoir; for this reservoir, west = gas, east = oil). I’m sure they had an idea what it could be, but didn’t know exactly where the boundaries were.

In some special cases, the seismic offshore can indicate gas, but I am not as familiar with the shale plays. Thinking it might not due to the density. Any geophysicists out there in the forum?

Was wondering if anyone has gotten their first check on the Sierra well??? The Casillas man told me to expect it the first week in June since they would be sent out at the last of the month.

IDK, but I am having a hard time getting somebody to answer an email or a phone call up there.