Legal Documents not QCMD

My mineral rights were inherited from a great uncle who passed away back in 1946. I have 3 documents for his estate. None of them are a Quit Claim Mineral Deed. Has anyone seen similar documents with titles like this: Final Account Order allowing Final Account for Executor Determining Heirs, & Final Degree of Distribution & Discharge Petition for Final Settlement, Determination of Heirs & for Distribution

The ‘Order’ is the only document with a ‘FILED’ stamp (Murray County). It shows April 1, 1953.

They mostly list the same properties in multiple counties. There some differences between them. Based on the document title descriptions, is there one that would be considered the authoritative document, the equivalent of a QCMD?

the abbreviation you are using is for a quitclaim Mineral deed. This is not the only way to transfer ownership.

There are three ways to transfer title to real property, which includes oil, gas and mineral rights. The first is by deed, wherein A sells or deeds the property to B. could be a sale, could be a gift. This would transfer the ownership from A to B. Just like when you buy or sell a house. The second way is by inheritance, when an ancestor dies, and the ownership of the house, land or oil & gas rights are transferred to the decedent’s spouse or children. so, if one inherits the property, there won’t be a deed. So, based only on what you’ve indicated, that is the way the ownership has been handed down. The final order should list who has been distributed the interest. Based on the age, I’m guessing it is your mother or father. To get it into you, you would need a final order in their probate, or a deed from them. So, don’t get hung up on finding a quitclaim mineral deed. The court transferred the ownership into whoever is in the final decree (again, which I suspect was one of your parents.) To summarize, it appears likely that record ownership is in one of your parents, you now have to prove how it got to you.

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Tim had an excellent summary. A probate order has the same power and effect as a deed for the property listed therein.